CAMPAN Jeanne Louise Genet, Madame (1752-1822) nstitutrice et pédagogue, elle dirigea la Maison d'Éducation de la Légion d'honneur d'Écouen

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CAMPAN Jeanne Louise Genet, Madame (1752-1822) nstitutrice et pédagogue, elle dirigea la Maison d'Éducation de la Légion d'honneur d'Écouen

L.A., mardi 29 germinal [April 19, 1803], to Eliza de LALLY-TOLENDAL; 8 pages in-4.
Beautiful letter to her former student about Jacques' poem
Delille, La Pitié, and her memories of the Revolution.
She had read La Pitié: "I was charmed by the touching episode which deals with the virtue and the wisdom of your kind parens. - This interesting poem is too close to the great crisis of our revolution not to find all the passions still in motion, which attracts many detractors, and will even reflect on the author the enmity of all the Patriots who usurped this title by victimizing and their virtuous
King and their Homeland, However, I am charmed that he has traced in such touching verses the very faithful history of my unfortunate masters, nothing is more exact than what he says and never could a tragic subject be more heartbreaking".
However, he makes a mistake "by giving the epithet of guilty to the city of Versailles in relation to the massacres of the prisoners of Orleans". She evokes her personal memories of September 10, 1792 in Versailles: she states "that the National Guard was out of the city and waiting for the prisoners at the Messagerie to protect their installation, that the massacre was committed by a horde of young savage peasants who were gathered in Versailles at the time, that it was ordered by monsters from Paris, that one of my sisters was condemned by the people to show herself on a balcony of her apartment above the scene of bloodshed that took place before her eyes". She saw the mayor RICHAUD "dashing on the cart to cover the unfortunate Duke of BRISSAC with his body, resisting for a long time the blows and the violence that was done to him before abandoning this interesting victim"... She adds that, the next day, "some of the monsters [...] came to change the name of the rue de l'orangerie to rue de la Vengeance, which the mayor had erased during the day"... This is why she defends this city.
Then she gives news of her house of education, in particular the visit of Eliza Monroe, who came to see her pension while her father
James MONROE "came to Paris on a special mission from the United States of America", the marriage of Constance Dubayet with General Charpentier, etc.. She ends with a reproach: "Write better Eliza. In truth you are not readable."
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