LAWRENCE DAVID HERBERT (1790-1869)

Lot 623
Aller au lot
3 000 - 4 000 EUR
Résultats avec frais
Résultat : 3 640 EUR

LAWRENCE DAVID HERBERT (1790-1869)

Lettre autographe signée adressée à Percival
Reginald STEPHENSEN Rottach-am-Tegernsee (Haute-Bavière), 5 septembre 1929, 2 pages in-4 à l'encre en anglais. (Traces de pliure, déchirure sans affectation au texte et rousseurs).
D. H. Lawrence, célèbre auteur de L'amant de Lady Chatterley, écrit une lettre à Percival Reginald Stephensen de Mandrake Press dans laquelle il critique les socialistes et surtout les reproductions photographiques de ces peintures.
«I'm glad you got a kick out of Eastwood & the miners & all. They were alive when I was a lad, so they can't be so very dead. And if they produced me, they must be a bit like me, somewhere. But as for coming out a socialist—the very nastiest attacks on me in the papers come from the Socialists & the Clyneside ‘workers' sort of people.
The miseries of Eastwood aren't really socialists, any more that I am, really—& they never will be. The socialist always kills the man, in a man.
It did Willie Hopkin a lot of harm. Look at Bernard Shaw! What I care about, in a man, is the man, not the socialist. And that very capacity for joy, for real fun, that I care about. Becoming self-conscious kills joy & fun only because we don't become genuinely aware of ourselves, right through. We stop short, & substitute a narcissus image, & that is the real death of all joy. The bane of socialists is that they are half self-conscious, & for the other half substitute a narcissus image of their own perfect rightness etc, which is hell.—And that's the trouble with Willie Hopkin—he never got down to the bed-rock of himself, as a man, so has footed all his life with a narcissus image of himself, & each of his two wives has been the better man of the marriage. Poor Sallie—she was the better man, indeed! And he says of her now ‘she had a mournful outlook on life.' “I should be glad if
I could have those two copies of the Paintings Book in Florence. I asked Enid Hilton to take three over to Paris, & send them from there.
But I may be too late—she may have gone. I suppose it wouldn't be safe to post them to Oriole? If not, I must find somebody else to take them. I had a letter asking if the Introduction to These Paintings could be used in America, in a magazine. Have you any objection?
It seems to me there can be nothing against it. Another letter asking if it could be done over there in a limited edition—Any objection to that? It seems to me American editions don't really affect the English one. And several times I have been asked for photographs of the pictures—odd ones. Have you got photographs of them all? I think I ought to be able to arrange an American limited edition with or without a few photographs, if the English edition is all sold. It would rouse
American interest. There can be no question of replica. I suppose never again will the whole colour book appear, like yours. “Frieda had a bone-setter who set her foot in one minute, after we've spent pounds on specialists, & now she walks all right. I've got a doctor in Munich who declares I ought to be well in a few weeks—with diet. So there you are. I want to write you one day about your Mandrake list.
I'm a bit sorry you've got Allister Crowley at such heavy tonnage. I feel his day is rather over. You need to be selective, not in too big a hurry with the Mandrake books, to build the thing up. You've a good thing there, but I'm afraid you'll overload it».
Stephensen, d'origine australienne, a collaboré avec Jack Lindsay au Fanfrolico Press, avant de le quitter pour fonder Mandrake Press dont le premier livre reproduit les oeuvres peintes de Lawrence. Dans cette lettre, Lawrence critique la couleur des reproductions.
Mes ordres d'achat
Informations sur la vente
Conditions de ventes
Retourner au catalogue