ATTRIBUÉ À DOMINIK THEOTOKOPOULOS, DIT LE GRECO HÉRAKLION, 1541 -1614, TOLÈDE

Lot 10
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Estimation :
80000 - 100000 EUR

ATTRIBUÉ À DOMINIK THEOTOKOPOULOS, DIT LE GRECO HÉRAKLION, 1541 -1614, TOLÈDE

Christ Teaching Doctors
Oil on panel 62,4 x 70,2 cm
Finding in the TempleOil on panel, 24,6 x 27,6 in. "In search of his own pictorial language, the painter tries, even in a small format, to achieve a spectacular and audacious painting"
In 1541, Domenico Theotokopoulos, known as Le Greco, was born in Candie (now Heraklion), where he spent the first part of his life. In his early years, he trained locally in the Byzantine tradition of icon painting, a manner that would profoundly influence his early works. Candie also had the peculiarity of being under the domination of Venice, a geopolitical situation that nourished the painter's art with Venetian models thanks to the engravings and copies that reached the island. In 1567, he left to continue his apprenticeship in Italy. In the middle of the 16th century, two major currents clashed. On the one hand, the powerful, muscular, mannerist drawing of Michelangelo (1475 -1564), whose aura still shone after his death. On the other, the intense work of colour promoted by Titian (1488 -1576), which was to become a school subject in the City of the Doges. It was finally in Venice that Greco settled at the age of 25. Nevertheless, the artist did not find his place in a city where commissions were divided among the great names of his contemporaries such as Veronese, Titian, Bassano and Tintoretto. Although he was unable to seduce the local elite, Le Greco was particularly touched by the local aesthetics he had begun to discover in Crete. He therefore left the city and continued his Italian stay in Rome. There, he discovered a city in the midst of an artistic transformation following the Council of Trent (1545-1563) and the Reformation; at the same time, he observed the monumental sculpturality of Michelangelo art. However, following the movement of the Reformation, the time had come to move away from mannerism, corporal expressiveness, body twisting, acidulous and bright colours, to the desire to address all the faith
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