[PARIS]. [TURGOT MICHEL ÉTIENNE (1690-1751)]. LUCAS CLAUDE (GRAVEUR) - BRETEZ LOUIS (DESSINATEUR) - AUBIN (AUTEUR)

Lot 88
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Result : 2 600EUR
[PARIS]. [TURGOT MICHEL ÉTIENNE (1690-1751)]. LUCAS CLAUDE (GRAVEUR) - BRETEZ LOUIS (DESSINATEUR) - AUBIN (AUTEUR)
[PARIS]. [TURGOT MICHEL ÉTIENNE (1690-1751)]. LUCAS CLAUDE (ENGRAVER) - BRETEZ LOUIS (DRAWER) - AUBIN (AUTHOR) Map of Paris. Started the year 1734. Drawn and engraved under the orders of Sir Michel Etienne Turgot [...]. Finished engraving in 1739 [...] Raised and drawn by Louis Bretez. Engraved by Claude Lucas and written by Aubin. Paris, [1739] In-plano (251 x 318 cm), plan engraved with etching and chisel, in 20 sheets assembled on "Grand Aigle" paper pasted on burlap. Superb plan of Paris, composed as an assemblage table, drawn in perspective as the crow flies. At the bottom of this general view, a cartouche surmounted by an allegory and the arms of the City of Paris includes a dedication. This plan of the entire capital was commissioned by Michel Étienne Turgot, then provost of the Paris merchants, from Louis Bretez, professor of perspective and member of the Académie de peinture. The latter worked for two years, starting in 1734, on very precise surveys of each street and each house, even penetrating into courtyards and gardens. In 1736, Claude Lucas, engraver of the Academy of Sciences, was commissioned to engrave with etching and chisel the 21 plates of the plan known as "Turgot", an undertaking which was not completed until 1739. Twenty plates make up the plan itself and the last one corresponds to an assembly table of these twenty plates. Intended above all to promote the grandeur of the city of Paris and the kingdom, this plan was widely distributed in the provinces of France and in the main courts of Europe. 251 x 318 cm Corners and edges damaged, in some places torn; numerous cracks and tears; traces of folds; freckles and wetness As a vast rural exodus began during the 18th century, there was increased competition between the European megalopolises. Paris was the largest city in the Christian West from the 12th century to the Renaissance, a veritable hub of commerce, playing on its h
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